The Use of Slang in Writing

Too much slang, like too much of any good thing, can be bad for you. – Godfather Wesley Hunter

 

slang_def

[EXAMPLE] “When ya come up from ’round da co’na hangin’ wit’ Jeff an’ dem, did yous ‘member ta stop ova dere ta da sto’ an’ grab dat wat I asked ya fo’?” just too much. This is a bad habit picked up from reading the titles of hip hop songs i.e. IN DA CLUB, ‘BOUT DAT LIFE [RULE OF THUMB] If it doesn’t change the SOUND then there’s probably no need to change the spelling.

Words like DEM/them, DEY/they, DA/the, FO/for, PO/poor, STO/store, DAT/that, JUS/just almost never have a useful meaning. Whereas words like GON’, AIN’T, Y’ALL, or even my personal babies: PROLLY and WHATN’T almost always do.

Bottom line: When it comes to slang, less is more. Your use of slang should almost be INVISIBLE and not cause the reader to have to slow down and re-read it. The reader is trying to breeze through a book, they’re not looking to be impressed by yo cre8tiv spizzellin’ trix…ijs

 

 

GODFATHER” Hunter is an incarcerated author from Los Angeles, Ca. He has  written several books covering a variety of genres, to include self-help/how-to/advisory, autobiography, poetry, urban romance, erotica and street lit. Godfather has even taught urban lit during his many years of incarceration. He makes an added effort to lace his writings with history, social-political consciousness and other such pearls of wisdom while penning  in a style which many have compared to the likes of James Patterson, John Grisham and Michhael Connelly

 

 

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